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Enchanted World of Lyra

Marine Biology | Underwater Photgraphy | Random Stuff
Sep 22 '14

ardatli:

sciencefictionbaby:

this next trick is a little something i like to call “bulking out my bibliography with articles I barely looked at”

“Works Sighted”

Sep 13 '14
"You’ll be fine. You’re 25. Feeling unsure and lost is part of your path. Don’t avoid it. See what those feelings are showing and use it. Take a breath. You’ll be okay. Even if you don’t feel okay all the time."
Louis C.K (via fitandhealthyhero)
Sep 12 '14
madamjellyfish666:

I tried not to reblog :v

madamjellyfish666:

I tried not to reblog :v

(Source: ForGIFs.com)

Sep 11 '14

padfoote:

hello! to celebrate reaching a huge follower goal (thank you!), i’ve decided to do a giveaway for my followers, and since i’m going to the harry potter studios in a couple of week’s time i thought that some harry potter-themed prizes from the gift shop would be a good idea!

rules:

must be following me

reblog as many times as you want, and you can like to keep track, but likes alone will not count

the deadline to enter is september 22nd, 11.59pm GMT

i’ll ship to to anywhere

there will be one winner, and two runners-up

winners will be selected using a number generator thing like random.org

you will win;

an ‘authentic’ harry potter scarf in the house of your choice

any harry potter wand available in the shop (literally any you want whether it’s harry’s, professor slughorn’s, or even the elder wand!)

the runner-ups will each receive a box of bertie bott’s every flavour beans

Good Luck! ^-^

Sep 7 '14

bubblevision:

Following on from the series, here is my “Mucky Secrets" documentary in full. It’s a nature documentary about the marine life of the Lembeh Strait at the heart of the Coral Triangle off north Sulawesi in Indonesia. The Lembeh Strait is a popular scuba diving destination, famed for its excellent "muck diving". A huge diversity of weird and wonderful marine creatures can be found on the mucky seabed, including everything from tropical fish to benthic sharks to nudibranchs. Critters compete for survival with an armoury including camouflage, mimicry, toxicity, and dazzling coloration.

"Mucky Secrets" is an excellent resource for scuba divers, aquarists, marine biology students and anybody interested in the underwater world. The documentary features underwater macro footage from many of Lembeh’s famous dive sites including Critter Hunt, Police Pier, Tanjung Kusu-Kusu, Nudi Falls, Aer Perang, Jahir, Makawide, Nudi Retreat, Retak Larry, TK (Teluk Kembahu), Hairball and Aw Shucks.

Marine life featured in the film:

0:00:00 Introduction
0:05:11 Corals
0:05:57 Tunicates - sea squirts - ascidians
0:06:37 Symbiosis - sea anemones - anemonefish (clownfish)

CRUSTACEANS
0:07:29 Commensal shrimps (partner shrimps)
0:09:12 Emperor shrimp
0:11:07 Mantis shrimps
0:12:34 Squat lobsters
0:13:27 Hermit crabs
0:14:26 True crabs
0:15:55 Sea Urchins

ELASMOBRANCHS
0:17:11 Blue spotted stingrays
0:18:15 Brownbanded bamboo shark

EELS
0:18:59 Snake eels
0:20:27 Moray eels
0:21:34 Ribbon eels

REEF FISHES
0:22:33 Cardinalfishes
0:24:43 Trumpetfish
0:25:58 Seahorses
0:27:06 Pygmy seahorse
0:28:30 Pipefishes
0:30:38 Ghost pipefishes
0:33:22 Shrimpfishes - razorfishes
0:33:58 Seamoths - short dragonfish
0:35:03 Oriental flying gurnard
0:35:58 Blennies
0:36:49 Gobies
0:37:46 Sea pen
0:38:17 Dragonets
0:40:49 Mandarinfish
0:42:08 Frogfishes
0:46:39 Juvenile fishes
0:47:12 Spotted parrotfish
0:48:20 Sweetlips
0:49:05 Yellowblotch razorfish
0:49:37 Filefishes
0:50:24 Boxfishes - cowfishes
0:50:57 Puffers (pufferfish)
0:52:21 Sharpnose puffers (tobies)
0:52:50 Porcupinefishes
0:53:45 Panther grouper
0:54:10 Whitemargin stargazer
0:54:54 Leopard flounder
0:55:25 Flatheads
0:56:36 Scorpionfishes
0:57:27 Ambon Scorpionfish
0:58:04 Rhinopias
0:59:50 Lionfishes
1:02:29 Demon stinger (spiny devilfish, bearded ghoul)
1:03:17 Fireworm
1:03:45 Waspfishes

MOLLUSCS
CEPHALOPODS
1:05:48 Cuttlefishes
1:08:38 Octopuses
1:11:34 Flame scallop
GASTROPODS
1:12:03 Sea snails
1:14:37 Sea slugs - nudibranchs
1:21:49 Sea slugs feeding
1:23:57 Nudibranchs mating
1:26:11 Sap-sucking slug
1:26:59 Headshield slugs
1:27:49 Sea hares
1:30:21 Polyclad flatworm
1:31:18 End credits

Sep 4 '14
Sep 4 '14
One of the office in my Wed-Thurs lecture’s building have this pinned on the door.

One of the office in my Wed-Thurs lecture’s building have this pinned on the door.

Sep 4 '14

currentsinbiology:

Beautiful and sad GIFs that show what’s happening to the ocean (TED,COM)

Scientist Sylvia Earle (TED Talk: My wish: Protect our oceans) has spent the past five decades exploring the seas. During that time, she’s witnessed a steep decline in ocean wildlife numbers — and a sharp incline in the number of ocean deadzones and oil drilling sites. An original documentary about Earle’s life and work premieres today on Netflix. Watch it here.

What happened to the coral reefs?

Between 1950 and 2014, half of the coral reefs across the oceans died.

What happened to tuna, sharks, and cod?

Between 1950 and 2014, Pacific Bluefin Tuna, sharks, and North Atlantic Cod were all almost fished to extinction. Between 5% and 10% remain.

The number of ocean deadzones then and now.

Ocean deadzones are spots in the sea where life no longer exists. They occur when massive fertilizer runoff (or other ocean crises) set in motion an oxygen-depriving chain of events leading to the death in one spot of fish, crabs and other sea creatures. In 1975, there was one documented deadzone. In 2014, there were 500+.

The number of oil drilling sites then and now.

Oil drilling in the Gulf Coast didn’t start and stop with the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil disaster. But the practice is younger than you might think. In 1947, there was just one oil drilling site. In 2014, there were more than 30,000.

Sep 1 '14

It has been a while since I posted something. So here’s something quite substantial for all of you.

Most of you know what animal is on the picture. For you who don’t know, it’s a Crown of Thorns Starfish (Acanthaster planci). This starfish is widely regarded as Undesirable Number One species regarding coral reef health because it ate coral polyps. And they often killed on sight by experienced diver and snorkeler.

So do any of you know how does it all began?

Our story began in 1969 when all of sudden this starfish explode in number. They’re everywhere and they’re eating the coral polyps in a big number AND they ate it so fast, there’s a widespread episode of coral bleaching all over the world.

Of course this make all the marine scientist shitting their pants. Predictions were made and most of them say that this starfish will eat the corals to extinction in less than a decade.

But was it really?

We’ll fast forward to the 1990s where it turns out: No. Not really.

The fact is that even though there are reefs that is severely damaged by starfish predation, none of the known coral species went extinct and none of the reef disappear due to it.

Furthermore, scientists analyzed the sediment and found layers of Crown-of-Thorns spines than suggest sometimes they will have a population outbreak and it will goes down again after they finished eating themself out of their home. And it has been going on for 7000 years!

So do we need to stop killing the starfish?

Well the thing is, there are many things that is killing our corals (ocean warming, ocean acidification, disease, etc.) so that it might not be able to sustain a healthy Crown-of-Thorns starfish population.

So judge for yourself: Is it okay to reduce the number of healthy Crown-of-Thorns starfish population in order to lessen the pressure on coral reef?

Source: Grigg (1992) : Coral reef environmental science: truth versus the Cassandra syndrome.

Photos by Lyra at Pramuka Island, Jakarta, Indonesia.

Aug 26 '14

Why does my Marine Conservation lecturer look like Peter Capaldi’s nicer brother.